Life-sized Elephant from one Piece of Paper by Origami Artist Sipho Mabona 

Latifa Echakhch, La dépossession, 2014, Toile de théâtre âpretée, peinture, tube acier et sangles, Dimensions variables, Toile : 1000 x 1000 cm, Vue de l’exposition “All around fades to a heavy sound”, kamel mennour, Paris, 2014

Latifa Echakhch, La dépossession, 2014, Toile de théâtre âpretée, peinture, tube acier et sangles, Dimensions variables, Toile : 1000 x 1000 cm, Vue de l’exposition “All around fades to a heavy sound”, kamel mennour, Paris, 2014

likeafieldmouse:

David Hammons - Bli-zaard Ball Sale (1983)

"The photos portraying Hammons with his neatly arranged rows of snowballs for sale are probably the most frequently reproduced images in the artist’s oeuvre. The piece has become iconic, the single ephemeral work – a work that is essentially about ephemerality – that has come to stand for his entire practice.”

Fragmentation Of The Body and Acceptance.
By Giron Mathilde

likeafieldmouse:

Brittany Nelson - Mordancage III

artruby:

Daniel Arsham, Draped Figure Arms Out, (2013)

artruby:

Daniel Arsham, Draped Figure Arms Out, (2013)

dawnawakened:

Broken Stone, Manipulated Portraits 2012

Heitor Magno is a visual artist from Brazil that works in various mediums, from painting to films, and photo manipulations. The Brazilian wonder does an amazing job capturing and manipulating/editing these portraits with these interesting rock formations. See more incredible portraits and other work from Heitor over at his main site, here.

Heitor’s work is also available here on Tumblr.

hifructosemag:

Laughing Squid recently featured German artist Wolfgang Stille and his creepy “Matchstickmen” installations. These large-scale matchsticks sculptures are made of trimmed lumber topped with human heads that resemble the burnt ends of matches. There are many of these human heads on sticks scattered about the space. These sculptures are disturbing both because of the separation of the heads from the figures’ bodies and because the heads appear to burnt up.

arpeggia:

Photography by Francesca Woodman | More posts